People have found an immunity to genome editing

Many of you have probably heard about the CRISPR genome editor, thanks to which it was already committed many discoveries. However, scientists from Stanford University say some people may have a natural immunity to the "intervention" in our DNA, which casts doubt on the usefulness of this technology.

People have found an immunity to genome editing

In a series of experiments by experts from Stanford University examined blood samples from 22 neonates and 12 adults to detect antibodies to Cas9. Recall that Cas9 used for cutting the DNA helix, by means of what actually occurs, and editing. The experts found that 65% of the participants in the experiment have blood T-cells (immune system cells) that can protect DNA from Cas9 exposure. Thus we can conclude that the "cure" of genetic diseases may be ineffective in more than half of all people. As stated by one of the authors of Matthew Porteous in an interview bioRxiv,

"Our own immunity would impede the safe and effective use of CRISPR and even can even cause serious toxic damage of the body. After all, the most common today Cas9 type of protein derived from Staphylococcus aureus and pyogenic streptococcus. This may explain the fact how our body is immune to such a young technology. After all, both of these bacteria attack humans for hundreds of years. However, the emergence of new CRISPR technology can solve this problem, because the potential of the editing of the genome is enormous. "